Battle Chasers Nightwar Review: Change It Up

Battle Chasers Nightwar Review: Change It Up

Battle Chasers Nightwar Review: Change It Up

Based on a hit comic book series from the late’90s, Battle Chasers: Nightwar successfully contrasts the look and feel of a comedian into a turn-based RPG. The richly animated intro shows precisely what you’re in for: a crazy world where steampunk matches Dungeons & Dragons, left in beautiful, deep-shaded colours. It was a spell which was frequently broken when it first released. After months worth of patches, tweaks, and improvements on other programs, but it’s a very different, and even stronger experience right out of the box on the Nintendo Switch.

The extensive assumption of this Battle Chasers comic is that a woman named Gully has taken a set of magical gauntlets, along with a motley crew composed of a sellsword, a magician, and a robot, on a journey to locate her lost father. Even the Nightwar chapter, however, is really a minor sidetrack from this journey. The team gets taken down by their airship on a mysterious island with serious problems of its own. Supposedly, the island is home to a mother lode of all mana, that has prompted something of a magic-based gold rush. Mercenaries, thieves, unsavory merchants and, most worrisome of all, the interest of an evil sorceress called Destra, are attracted to the island. The team’s plans to depart dissolve to a trek which goes deep into the island’s most deepest areas.

Battle Chasers Nightwar Review
Battle Chasers Nightwar Review

Battle Chasers endears you from the process of establishing its universe, characters, and combat systems. Garrison, the protagonist, is just what you may expect in the square-jawed warrior with a terrible backstory: his terse character keeps him at arm’s length from his cohorts. But on the flipside, the hulking mech, Calibretto, is a gentle soul that behaves more as the defacto healer, as well as the beating heart of the narrative as it goes along. The cast at big brings infectious nature and energy to each scene, and all this is underscored by a superbly diverse soundtrack, flavoring ordinary medieval experience anthems with everything from Chinese series instruments to bassy, trip-hop backbeats.

The game’s overworld is sprinkled with chances to battle oozing slimes, savage wolf men, along with surly prospectors. Dilapidated little shanty towns pop up along the way, as well as intermittent side quests, which normally impart a bit of lore before requesting your band to thwart a high-ranking enemy in a dangerous place. The bread and butter of the sport, however, is its own major dungeons. Eight in total, the dungeons have been all procedurally created. Despite the randomization, each room and its design is impressively detailed, with easily integrated puzzles, that the majority of the time that it’s impossible to tell every dungeon was not meticulously laid out before you reset a single, and re-enter to find an unrecognizable location.

From the outset, battle is rather standard turn-based fare. Veterans of the game will find that the problem curve was evened out in ways in which ancient battles continue to be quite doable, but don’t go too easy on new players. The first couple of hours are filled with hard hits and unexpected deaths for people who don’t stay alert. Fundamental enemies hit for dozens of points from damage in one wave, which makes debuff effects like Poison and Bleeding inside their aftermath before you even really understand what they do.

Thankfully, it’s rather simple to turn the tables. Every character has a unique ability to influence enemies inside dungeons–stunning, ambushing, or even igniting them–just in front of a fight kicks off. The primary gimmick during a fight is the Overcharge system. Fundamental attacks contribute to a distinctive pool of red mana points which can be employed to cast magic and tech strikes, instead of actual mana points. The new balance of development makes it much less difficult to obtain a foothold on earth, where no fight feels too excruciating. For those fights that do, the elimination of degree restrictions on gear also means that the perfect tool for the job is not too far out of reach. MP still stays in short supply as the game grows, however. One should still be mindful about whether to construct Overcharge or expend mana when utilizing abilities. This makes increasingly tricky, however in a manner that keeps you participated in each conflict, however small.

There were two key issues with Battle Chasers as it initially introduced: A severely steep difficulty curve as the match evolved into its second and third actions, and frequent, aggravating load times moving into both battles and new locations. The bad news is that the next issue remains. Even on the more effective PS4, months of spots still leave an issue where even just getting into a battle in the overworld map may stop the match dead for 30 seconds to load one, low-level enemy. At least this system receives 60fps conflicts as a consolation prize. The Switch has no such advantage, together with not only a lower resolution, but occasional stutters at framerate the active and showy the attacks. On both approaches, moving from the overworld into some dungeon or vice versa can keep you trapped on a loading screen for near a minute.

The good thing is that everything else feels wonderful. Changes to the game’s XP and various store economies make it easier to maintain your companions ahead of the curve through routine gameplay rather than through dull grinding–though that is still an alternative if you want it to function, and the rewards are now a whole lot more deserving of this effort. The same considerations still have to be made with each new bit of equipment. Armor typically increases a character’s HPendurance, and speed, however drastically lowers physical and magical shield –stats that matter against more powerful enemies. The trick of this is locating things that counterbalance the loss, and the probability of that occurring, since it stands, have now been enhanced for the better.

Past the challenge of combat, Battle Chasers is continuing through the strength of its narrative, a rollicking story that takes our heroes to hell and backagain. It’s augmented by some sharp dialogue, gorgeous artwork, and an outfit that plays exceptionally well off of each other. Lots of work has gone into Nightwar since its first launch, and the balancing advancements make it an easy game to advocate on all platforms.

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